Gen Z calls for one-stop-shop GPs, AMAQ survey finds

16 Dec 2019


Gen Z

Gen Z calls for one-stop-shop GPs, AMAQ survey finds

Queensland's Gen Z is driving a driving a shift towards one-stop-shop primary health care that would see GP clinics offering a broader range of services, including x-rays and psychology appointments.

AMA Queensland surveyed more than 1000 people in regional and urban areas to measure community attitudes towards primary health care delivery and found more than 90 per cent of 18-24-year-olds wanted their GP practices to also offer x-rays, pharmacies, physiotherapy and more.

Older Queenslanders are less likely to want extra on-site services with the survey revealing 36 per cent of 55–64-year-olds and 51 per cent of people aged over 65 would prefer their GP remained a stand-alone doctor’s clinic.

The survey also revealed that 85 per cent of Queenslanders of all ages - from Gen Z to Baby Boomers - had a regular GP compared with 52 per cent who had a regular dentist and only 40 per cent who had a regular pharmacist.

“People are increasingly more likely to have a regular GP with age, starting from 68 per cent of 18-24-year-olds and reaching 98 per cent of those aged over 65 years,” said AMA Queensland President Dr Dilip Dhupelia.

“Overall, the vast majority of Queenslanders surveyed have a regular GP and more than three-quarters see their doctor as their first port of call for health care.”

The survey found Queenslanders turned to a GP in the first instance rather than pharmacists, physiotherapists or other health practitioners for a range of medical complaints, including headaches, contraception, vaccinations, infections and back pain.

Dr Dhupelia said people want consistent, expert medical advice and a private conversation with a trusted confidante when it comes to their health issues.

“The survey confirms not only where GPs add value to their community during their consultations, but also how they can improve the delivery of healthcare while ensuring patient safety remains the top priority.”

X-rays, scans and other imaging services were the most preferred (56 per cent) extra co-located service, followed by a pharmacy, psychologist or counsellor, alternative medicine practitioner and a physiotherapist. Just over one quarter of all Queenslanders (26 per cent) wanted a stand-alone doctor’s clinic.

Dr Dhupelia said AMA had been urging the Federal Government to lift the ban that currently prevented pharmacists from co-locating in GP clinics.

“Relaxing these rules will improve access and delivery of health care for patients and provide convenience,” he said.

“We also support the Commonwealth Government’s and Pharmacy Board of Australia’s preference for supervised prescribing across primary health care services, a model that allows pharmacists to work closely with doctors in within GP practices for improved care for patients.”

Dr Dhupelia said the survey confirmed GPs were highly valued for their skill and were viewed by Queenslanders as an integral part of the health system.

View Media Release here


Regional Queenslanders write script for future health care

Regional Queenslanders rely on their GPs as the first port of call for health care, according to a new survey that quizzed more than 1000 people across the state.

The AMA Queensland survey measured community attitudes to primary health care and found 84 per cent of regional Queenslanders had a regular GP they consulted each time they needed medical advice or treatment.

Confidentiality and expert advice were the most highly valued attributes of having a regular GP, according to the survey.

“People want consistent, expert medical advice and a private conversation with a trusted confidante,” said AMA Queensland President Dr Dilip Dhupelia.

“The survey also found that regional Queenslanders, like their city counterparts, are most likely to turn to a GP in the first instance, rather than a physiotherapist, pharmacist or other practitioner, for help with common health care needs such as contraception, infections, back pain and headaches.”

While 29 per cent of regional Queenslanders want their GP clinics to remain stand-alone doctor’s practices, most respondents (71 per cent) want a broader range of on-site services offered in the future.

“This includes services such as x-rays, scans and other imaging, physiotherapy, pharmacy, psychologists or counsellors,” Dr Dhupelia said.

“The survey confirms not only where GPs add value to their community during their consultations, but also how they can improve the delivery of healthcare in the future. Regional Queenslanders clearly value the skill of GPs in their local areas.”

Dr Dhupelia said AMA had been urging the Federal Government to lift the ban that currently prevented pharmacists from co-locating in GP clinics as part of stringent pharmacy ownership and location laws.

“Relaxing these rules will improve access and delivery of health care for patients and improve convenience, especially for regional and rural Queenslanders who often travel long see their GP,” he said.

Dr Dhupelia said AMA Queensland also supported the Commonwealth Government’s and Pharmacy Board of Australia’s preference for supervised prescribing within primary health care services, a model that would allow pharmacists to work closely with doctors in GP practices for improved patient care.

View Media Release here


MEDIA CONTACTS:
Chiara Lesevre, AMA Queensland – 0419 735 641
Fran Metcalf, Sequel PR – 0417 627 867


Published: 16 Dec 2019